MUM – Google’s New Algorithm To Improve Quality Of Searches

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Google always ensures to deliver the best search results to its users. Thus, it keeps on introducing the newest algorithm. Earlier, Google used to rely on the BERT algorithm (Bidirectional Encoder Representations From Transformers) to provide relevant results for search queries. Google continues to get better. It keeps on launching better versions of the existing algorithms. The same happened with BERT; Google launched MUM (Multitask Unified Model) to improve the quality of search results. 

What is MUM (Multitask Unified Model)?

Before MUM was introduced, Google could only give precise answers to the simplest questions like – ‘Which date is today?’ Google decided to work on this limitation. The continual efforts of Google’s team incorporated machine learning & NLP (Natural language processing), enabling Google to read and understand the user’s query meticulously. This is how MUM managed to be a part of Google’s algorithm. 

Was It An Easy Task For Google To Introduce the MUM Algorithm To Better Search Results?

The MUM algorithm is more efficient and precise than BERT. It delivers relevant search results after understanding the user’s input. Just after the integration of this algorithm with Google, a rise in searches was observed. 

Since MUM needed to be trained to deliver results in 75 international languages, it indeed wasn’t an easy task. Besides that, MUM did the information gathering and translating jobs, which is quite daunting because a humongous database needs to be covered. 

For example, A person is willing to plan a holiday in Tanzania. He is researching on Google about the famous places this country has. The person wants to read the pieces of content in his native language & NOT in Swahili (A language spoken in Tanzania). Here comes the role of Google. Google must translate the content into several languages to ensure natives understand that. 

An Applause-worthy fact for MUM is – ‘It is overcoming all the potential challenges and delivering accurate results.’ 

Can MUM impact SEO? 

Many SEO Toronto executives are spreading a baseless rumor – ‘With the introduction of MUM, the number of clicks on search results will decrease.’ The MUM algorithm does not aim to spoon-feed the users with the desired results. The primary motive of this algo is to understand the user’s query and provide relevant & intent-satisfying search results. In that sense, MUM has definitely given a new direction to SEO efforts. Here are the potential changes that every SEO strategy will experience – 

Content For Wider Targeted Audience 

Earlier, this translating thing wasn’t a part of Google’s algorithm, and thus the content strategist had to prepare content for a narrowed group of targeted audience. Now Google has started translating content into many international languages; the content strategist needs to be careful when writing content. Besides SEO Toronto Executives also need to work on page titles & meta descriptions. They should be informative enough to catch the attention of international audiences even when translated into their native language. 

Keyword May Under-Rate

When Google wasn’t smart enough to understand the intent of the user’s search, it heavily relied on keywords. But MUM has made Google’s intent-identifying process more refined. However, the importance of keywords hasn’t completely vanished. They do matter to some extent. But, now, Google prefers to read and analyze the whole content before presenting it in search results. Keywords may be used for broad filtration. But the heavy reliance on keywords will not take you anywhere. 

Conclusion 

The MUM algorithm can be considered a revolution in the search engine world. This algorithm has refined the way Google thinks and interprets users’ queries. Significantly fewer users are returning dissatisfied from the search engine result page because google has become intelligent enough to read the user’s mind and deliver the expected results. 

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